Matt Miller, The Scientist, First Draft

11 Jun

INT. SCIENTIST IN A SHED

When a stone is dropped into a glass,

or a body slides into a bath,

we call the movement of water

from one place to another displacement.

 

We can safely assume then, perhaps,

that the act of displacement involves

being moved from somewhere

to somewhere else.

 

There tends to be a catalyst.

The water doesn’t move,

doesn’t slosh up the sides and spill

by itself.

 

It’s pulled by the moon or wrestled

from its resting state

by the introduction of an unwelcome

guest into its space.

 

The same applies to you.

There are reasons for everything.

Perhaps a lover left you on a shelf,

tied you down

 

with promises of return so that

you couldn’t wriggle forward,

fall and smash, enjoy fragmentation

on the carpet.

 

Perhaps the government

or some similar body

of powerful apes with multiple arms

dragged you from this place to that

 

or that place to this. You feel

you don’t fit, though its your job to.

There are benefits to reap

for the round peg here.

 

Perhaps it’s the same for me.

Though I do not feel displaced physically,

I remember still the way

you buried your nose in the side

 

of the head of your bear,

I remember your laugh.

I remember waking up with you

and feeling that

 

I might be in a tent in a land

with no borders or obligations

other than to your body and lips

and thoughts.

 

Part of me still exists there,

so that like this glass of water

the splash has carried part of me

over the rim

 

and left the rest of the liquid

in a place it once was.

The many parts of the whole

miss each other greatly

 

and long for impossible reunion.

It is not possible to reverse

a violent displacement.

But spills can be wiped away

 

and fresh eyes can see more clearly

through the distortion.

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One Response to “Matt Miller, The Scientist, First Draft”

  1. Victor Haven June 11, 2014 at 9:45 pm #

    Breathtaking! So original and profound. This is a diamond. I will always remember the symbolism. Cheers.

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